Texans vs Colts Live

Texans vs Colts Live: The 2019-20 NFL season week 7 is finally Live Stream here and that means millions of fans are looking for the best and easiest way to watch every game. Whether you’re on a smartphone or tablet, or at home, the NFL Sunday Ticket remains one of the best options. And now, you can get the Sunday Ticket even if you cut the cord and canceled cable.

Click Here To Watch NFL Football Live Stream

==GAME INFO==
NFL Football Game 2019 Week-7
Team: Texans vs Colts Live
Start Time: Today
Live/Repeat: Live

Watch NFL Games Today Live Stream Free Online on all platforms. With the help of newer technologies, it has become very easy to enjoy live games on gadgets. Fans can watch NFL Live stream online on their Ipad, Mac, Pc, laptop or any Android device.

In this guide we’ll show you how to get the NFL Sunday Ticket without DirecTV. While Thursday games will split on Amazon Prime and Fox this year, you can watch everything with the NFL Ticket.

DirecTV offers standalone packages that are finally affordable, which is your best route. Plus, students can get the Sunday Ticket TV U (University) for under $100. Here’s how to get started.

How to Get the NFL Sunday NightTicket Without DirecTV

Let me say that again. If you can’t get DirecTV or don’t have a home that can use a satellite dish, you can still get the Sunday Ticket. You’re also eligible for the service if you live in a multi-unit building like an apartment, condo or dorm room. Our first method is something everyone can try to do, so we’ll start with that. What we’re trying to do here is get the NFL Sunday Ticket without paying for DirecTV. Essentially DirecTV will let users buy the Sunday Ticket without a cable subscription only if they live in an area DirecTV isn’t offered. A great example is a home where installing a Satellite dish isn’t an option or someone on a college campus. That said, even if you can get a dish, this method could still work for you.

To start, simply go to the Directv website.

I have access to DirecTV at my house, yet this standalone package is still available to me, oddly. One which I immediately took advantage of. They check eligibility with your address. We’ve also heard using a P.O. Box for your address during the online setup will show the location as unavailable, and let users select the stand-alone package. Or at least it did in 2018. Instantly giving you the Sunday ticket. Then sign in on a smartphone, laptop, or streaming device for all the action.

Basically, you sign up for a standalone package and enjoy the Ticket without DirecTV. Here were the options last year, and they’re offering something similar for the 2019-20 season, although the MAX plan is $395, which is pretty damn expensive. DirecTV has more info on the website.

If your address is eligible, you actually have a few different packages you can choose from. Start with NFLST.TV To Go or pay top dollar for NFLST.TV Max.

The Max bundle gives you the NFL Red Zone, that way you can catch every TD and almost all red-zone drives, which is nice. Not to mention Fantasy Zone so you can win your league and helps with stats and information week in and week out. This package costs $395.99 for the season or $99 per month, instead of the $359 we had to pay in previous years. The price goes up every season if feels like, which sucks.

Keep in mind that you can also upgrade at any moment to one of the more expensive plans. So, if you decide a few weeks in that you want more game action or the full Fantasy stats and analysis, just upgrade to the Max plan.

Bonus Tip: If you renew your subscription in 2017 and again in 2018, you’re locked into the previous year’s lower prices, which is pretty awesome. We recommend signing up again today, as it’ll likely cost even more next year and you’ll want that grandfathered price.

See, if you don’t have DirecTV you can still get the NFL Sunday Ticket starting at under $200.

Georgia vs Kentucky

Georgia vs Kentucky Live Stream: The 2019-20 NCAA College Football 2019 season week 8 is finally here and that means millions of fans are looking for the best and easiest way to watch every game. Whether you’re on a smartphone or tablet, or at home, the NCAA Week 8 Ticket remains one of the best options. And now, you can get the Saturday Ticket even if you cut the cord and canceled cable.

Best bets for Week 8 college football games

Talk about a hot streak. Chris “The Bear” Fallica is on quite a roll over the past three weeks, going a perfect 12-0 on his picks. So what’s in store for this week? The Bear is 12-0 over the last three weeks and looks to keep handing out winners. The guys are big on some weekday games and have plenty to discuss on the podcast. Listen

In this article, “Stanford Steve” Coughlin and “The Bear” break down Week 8 of the college football season as only they can, offering their top bets, nuggets, games to stay away from and a special money-line underdog parlay to jump on. With the season in full swing, the guys are ready to continue their prognostications. Here we go with Week 8 picks.

How to Watch NCAA College Football Game Week 8 Live Stream Free? 

The Bear: Both teams have injuries to address at quarterback, with Hank Bachmeier nursing a hip injury for the Broncos and BYU’s Jaren Hall working his way back from concussion symptoms. Boise has found a way to cover all but one of its games this season, and BYU has had a couple of tough-luck road losses the past two weeks. I get the sense that a return to Provo and the need for a win here to provide an easier path to bowl eligibility will result in a good effort from the Cougars. Every Thursday during the season, Bill Connelly, Doug Kezirian, Preston Johnson and Phil Steele will provide their top plays across the college football landscape.

Here are their best bets for the eighth full week of the college football season:

Season ATS records:

Connelly: 13-8-1 (1-2 last week)
Kezirian: 26-17-1 (4-0-1 last week)
Johnson: 21-16-1 (5-2 last week)
Steele: 13-24 (0-5 last week)
The UCLA Bruins (1-5), led by quarterback Dorian Thompson-Robinson and head coach Chip Kelly, meet the Stanford Cardinal (3-3), led by quarterback K.J. Costello and head coach David Shaw, in a college football Week 8 game at Stanford Stadium in Stanford, California, on Thursday, October 17, 2019 (10/17/19).

Fans can watch the game online with Hulu or Sling.

Here’s what you need to know:

What: College Football Week 8

Who: UCLA vs. Stanford

When: Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019

Time: 9 p.m. EDT

Where: Stanford Stadium

TV: ESPN

Channel finder: Verizon Fios, AT&T U-verse, Comcast Xfinity, Spectrum/Charter, Optimum/Altice, Cox, DIRECTV, Dish, Hulu, fuboTV, Sling.

Listen: SiriusXM (free trial)

Live stream: Hulu, Sling.

Line: Stanford -3.5 O/U 49.5 | Get betting tips and analysis via NJ.com/betting

***

After a sluggish stretch in September, Stanford looks to be rounding into form just in time for a matchup against the Cardinal’s favorite opponent in recent years.

Stanford has shaken off a three-game losing streak to win back-to-back games, including a victory over then-No. 15 ranked Washington, leading into Thursday night’s game against UCLA. The Cardinal (3-3, 2-2 Pac-12) have won 11 straight games in the series against the rival Bruins (1-5, 1-2).

“Winning last week was very big for our confidence and building momentum,” linebacker Gabe Reid said of the 23-13 win over Washington on Oct. 5. “We pride ourselves in how we play and felt like maybe the first quarter of the season didn’t really reflect our true potential. We’re looking forward to proving what a great defensive team we are.”

Little went right for Stanford during a stretch of three straight double-digit losses in September to Southern California, Central Florida and Oregon as injuries on the offensive line and at quarterback hampered the offense.

But little has gone wrong for the Cardinal the past decade against the Bruins. They have won every meeting since 2009, with only one of those games decided by fewer than seven points. UCLA had never lost more than seven straight to any opponent before this skid started.

“It’s irrelevant to this game,” Bruins coach Chip Kelly said. “The game four years ago shouldn’t matter in this game. It can’t be a psychological factor if no one talks about it.”

Napoli vs Hellas Verona Live

Napoli vs Hellas Verona Live: Napoli vs Hellas Verona Live Stream Online Soccer Game 2019 Watch Free TV Schedule, With the help of newer technologies, it has become very easy to enjoy the games on gadgets. Today Soccer games engineered to offer the highest quality services at the best prices. Fans only have to pay a little amount to enjoy the Football Games. Fans can watch Football Game online on their Ipad, Mac, Pc, laptop or any Android device.

North Korea’s football team played like it was “waging a war” during a World Cup qualifier in Pyongyang against South Korea, the South’s manager has said.

The two national teams played out a scoreless draw on Tuesday at the huge Kim Il-sung Stadium, which was empty of spectators. The match took place under a media blackout, and the South Koreans first spoke to journalists about the conditions on their return to Seoul on Thursday.

The team’s general manager, Choi Young-il, said the South Korean football association (KFA) would discuss whether to submit a complaint to Fifa over what he described as North Korea’s failure to properly accommodate the visiting team and decision to block media and spectators.

No fans, no media and no goals as Koreas play out World Cup qualifier in empty stadium
Read more
Choi told reporters at Incheon airport that the North Koreans played like they were “waging a war”, violently swinging their elbows and hands and driving into their opponents knee-first when competing for balls in the air. “I have never seen something like this in soccer before,” he said.

Son Heung-min, South Korea’s captain and Tottenham striker, said: “The opponents were very rough, and there were moments when very abusive language was exchanged. It was hard to concentrate on the match because you were thinking about avoiding injury first … It’s an accomplishment that we returned from a game like that without injury.”

No foreign media were allowed and the game was not broadcast live.

The Fifa president, Gianni Infantino, who also attended the match, issued a statement on Tuesday saying he was “disappointed to see there were no fans in the stands”.

He said: “We were surprised by this and by several issues related to its live broadcast and problems with visas and access for foreign journalists.”

Pyongyang’s official Korean Central News Agency published only a brief match report, saying the “game of attacks and counterattacks ended in a draw 0-0”.

North Korea did provide a DVD recording of the match to South Korean football officials, but the South Korean TV channel KBS cancelled plans to broadcast the game on tape delay because of the video’s poor quality, according to the broadcaster and the KFA.

“We probably won’t get another video from North Korea,” said Park Jae-sung, a KFA official, adding the video was unfit for South Korea’s high-definition TV services.

The North had been expected to have a clear home advantage in a 50,000-capacity stadium devoid of opposition fans, but South Korean players and football officials were surprised to discover there would be no home support either.

Son said it was regrettable that South Korea, which has a stronger team on paper, could not return with three points, but admitted their opponents’ physical playing style had affected morale.
When they were not playing or training, South Korean players and staff were holed up at the Koryo hotel, which appeared to have no other guests, Choi said. They had no outside contact, having left their mobile phones at the South Korean embassy in Beijing before entering the North. Choi said North Korean officials did not inform the South Korean team the match would be played in an empty stadium.

“We got there an hour and a half early and kept thinking that the gate will open and a crowd of 50,000 would pour in,” Choi said. “But the gate never opened until the end.”

The game was the first competitive meeting between the national men’s teams in the North Korean capital, although the North hosted the South in a friendly in 1990.
South Korea’s national soccer team described their World Cup qualifier against North Korea in Pyongyang as a “rough” match played under strange conditions that may be raised with FIFA.

The historic match ended in a scoreless draw Tuesday at huge Kim Il Sung Stadium, which was empty of spectators. The match was also under a media blackout, and the South Koreans first spoke to journalists about the playing conditions upon their return to Seoul on Thursday.

“The opponents were very rough, and there were moments when very abusive language was exchanged,” Tottenham striker Son Heung-min said.

“It was hard to concentrate on the match because you were thinking about avoiding injury first … It’s an accomplishment that we returned from a game like that without injury,” Son told reporters at Incheon International Airport.

The team’s general manager Choi Young-il said the South Korean soccer association, known as KFA, will discuss whether to submit a complaint to FIFA over what he described as North Korea’s failure to properly accommodate the visiting team and decision to block media and spectators.

North Korea kept out South Korean media and spectators and refused a live broadcast from the stadium.

FIFA President Gianni Infantino also attended the match, and on Tuesday issued a statement saying he was “disappointed to see there were no fans in the stands.”

“We were surprised by this and by several issues related to its live broadcast and problems with visas and access for foreign journalists,” Infantino said.

Pyongyang’s official Korean Central News Agency published only a brief match report, saying the “game of attacks and counterattacks ended in a draw 0:0.”

North Korea did provide a DVD recording of the match to South Korean soccer officials, but South Korean TV channel KBS canceled plans to broadcast the game on tape delay because of the video’s quality, according to the broadcaster and KFA.

“We probably won’t get another video from North Korea,” said Park Jae-sung, a KFA official, adding the video was unfit for South Korea’s high-definition TV services

The North had been expected to have a unique home advantage in the 50,000-capacity stadium devoid of South Korean fans, but South Korean players and soccer officials were surprised to realize there would be no home crowd support, either.

Son said it was regrettable that South Korea, which has a stronger team on paper, couldn’t return with three points, but admitted that their opponents’ physical play got into the players’ heads.

Choi, a former defender who played for South Korea during the 1994 World Cup held in the United States, said the North Koreans played like they were “waging a war,” violently swinging their elbows and hands and driving into their opponents knee first when competing for balls in air.

“I have never seen something like this in soccer before,” he said.

When they weren’t playing or training, South Korean players and staff were holed up at the Koryo Hotel, which appeared to have no other guests, Choi said. They had no outside contact, having left their cellphones at the South Korean Embassy in Beijing before entering the North. Choi said North Korean officials didn’t inform the South Korean team the match would be played in an empty stadium.

“We got there an hour and a half early and kept thinking that the gate will open and a crowd of 50,000 would pour in,” Choi said. “But the gate never opened until the end.”

The game was the first competitive meeting between the national men’s teams in the North Korean capital, although the North hosted the South in a friendly in 1990.

North Korea in recent months has severed virtually all cooperation with the South amid deadlocked nuclear negotiations with the United States, and repeatedly ignored the South’s calls for discussions on media coverage issues and allowing South Korean cheer squads ahead of the game.

South Korean Unification Minister Kim Yeon-chul, Seoul’s point man on North Korea, said during a parliamentary session on Thursday that the way the North handled the game was “very disappointing” and reflected the stalemate in inter-Korean relations.

Some experts say the North was expressing its political displeasure with the South by shutting out rival reporters and fans, but opted to compete in an empty stadium at home in an effort to level the playing field and avoid questions about fairness.

Others say North Korea might have been concerned about the possibility of its national team losing to the South in front of a massive home crowd, which would have been a humiliating development for leader Kim Jong Un, who has a passion for sports.

The awkward buildup to the game “demonstrates the immense discontent North Korea has for (South Korea)” for its failure to break away from its U.S. ally and restart inter-Korean economic projects held back by U.S.-led sanctions, said Choi Kang, vice president of Seoul’s Asan Institute for Policy Studies.

During qualification for the 2010 World Cup, North Korea chose to host games against South Korea in Shanghai, refusing to hoist the South Korean flag and play the South Korean anthem on its soil.

The fate of the game in Pyongyang was uncertain until last month when the governing body of Asian soccer informed the KFA that the North decided it would host the qualifier as scheduled.

South Korea’s two Group H matches against North Korea will be crucial in qualifying for the World Cup. The second match between the Koreas is scheduled for June 4 in South Korea.

South Korea has dominated the past 17 inter-Korean matches with seven wins, one loss and nine draws.

Group H also includes Lebanon, Turkmenistan and Sri Lanka.

 

 

Lazio vs Atalanta Live

Lazio vs Atalanta Live: Lazio vs Atalanta Live Stream Online Soccer Game 2019 Watch Free TV Schedule, With the help of newer technologies, it has become very easy to enjoy the games on gadgets. Today Soccer games engineered to offer the highest quality services at the best prices. Fans only have to pay a little amount to enjoy the Football Games. Fans can watch Football Game online on their Ipad, Mac, Pc, laptop or any Android device.

North Korea’s football team played like it was “waging a war” during a World Cup qualifier in Pyongyang against South Korea, the South’s manager has said.

The two national teams played out a scoreless draw on Tuesday at the huge Kim Il-sung Stadium, which was empty of spectators. The match took place under a media blackout, and the South Koreans first spoke to journalists about the conditions on their return to Seoul on Thursday.

The team’s general manager, Choi Young-il, said the South Korean football association (KFA) would discuss whether to submit a complaint to Fifa over what he described as North Korea’s failure to properly accommodate the visiting team and decision to block media and spectators.

No fans, no media and no goals as Koreas play out World Cup qualifier in empty stadium
Read more
Choi told reporters at Incheon airport that the North Koreans played like they were “waging a war”, violently swinging their elbows and hands and driving into their opponents knee-first when competing for balls in the air. “I have never seen something like this in soccer before,” he said.

Son Heung-min, South Korea’s captain and Tottenham striker, said: “The opponents were very rough, and there were moments when very abusive language was exchanged. It was hard to concentrate on the match because you were thinking about avoiding injury first … It’s an accomplishment that we returned from a game like that without injury.”

No foreign media were allowed and the game was not broadcast live.

The Fifa president, Gianni Infantino, who also attended the match, issued a statement on Tuesday saying he was “disappointed to see there were no fans in the stands”.

He said: “We were surprised by this and by several issues related to its live broadcast and problems with visas and access for foreign journalists.”

Pyongyang’s official Korean Central News Agency published only a brief match report, saying the “game of attacks and counterattacks ended in a draw 0-0”.

North Korea did provide a DVD recording of the match to South Korean football officials, but the South Korean TV channel KBS cancelled plans to broadcast the game on tape delay because of the video’s poor quality, according to the broadcaster and the KFA.

“We probably won’t get another video from North Korea,” said Park Jae-sung, a KFA official, adding the video was unfit for South Korea’s high-definition TV services.

The North had been expected to have a clear home advantage in a 50,000-capacity stadium devoid of opposition fans, but South Korean players and football officials were surprised to discover there would be no home support either.

Son said it was regrettable that South Korea, which has a stronger team on paper, could not return with three points, but admitted their opponents’ physical playing style had affected morale.
When they were not playing or training, South Korean players and staff were holed up at the Koryo hotel, which appeared to have no other guests, Choi said. They had no outside contact, having left their mobile phones at the South Korean embassy in Beijing before entering the North. Choi said North Korean officials did not inform the South Korean team the match would be played in an empty stadium.

“We got there an hour and a half early and kept thinking that the gate will open and a crowd of 50,000 would pour in,” Choi said. “But the gate never opened until the end.”

The game was the first competitive meeting between the national men’s teams in the North Korean capital, although the North hosted the South in a friendly in 1990.
South Korea’s national soccer team described their World Cup qualifier against North Korea in Pyongyang as a “rough” match played under strange conditions that may be raised with FIFA.

The historic match ended in a scoreless draw Tuesday at huge Kim Il Sung Stadium, which was empty of spectators. The match was also under a media blackout, and the South Koreans first spoke to journalists about the playing conditions upon their return to Seoul on Thursday.

“The opponents were very rough, and there were moments when very abusive language was exchanged,” Tottenham striker Son Heung-min said.

“It was hard to concentrate on the match because you were thinking about avoiding injury first … It’s an accomplishment that we returned from a game like that without injury,” Son told reporters at Incheon International Airport.

The team’s general manager Choi Young-il said the South Korean soccer association, known as KFA, will discuss whether to submit a complaint to FIFA over what he described as North Korea’s failure to properly accommodate the visiting team and decision to block media and spectators.

North Korea kept out South Korean media and spectators and refused a live broadcast from the stadium.

FIFA President Gianni Infantino also attended the match, and on Tuesday issued a statement saying he was “disappointed to see there were no fans in the stands.”

“We were surprised by this and by several issues related to its live broadcast and problems with visas and access for foreign journalists,” Infantino said.

Pyongyang’s official Korean Central News Agency published only a brief match report, saying the “game of attacks and counterattacks ended in a draw 0:0.”

North Korea did provide a DVD recording of the match to South Korean soccer officials, but South Korean TV channel KBS canceled plans to broadcast the game on tape delay because of the video’s quality, according to the broadcaster and KFA.

“We probably won’t get another video from North Korea,” said Park Jae-sung, a KFA official, adding the video was unfit for South Korea’s high-definition TV services

The North had been expected to have a unique home advantage in the 50,000-capacity stadium devoid of South Korean fans, but South Korean players and soccer officials were surprised to realize there would be no home crowd support, either.

Son said it was regrettable that South Korea, which has a stronger team on paper, couldn’t return with three points, but admitted that their opponents’ physical play got into the players’ heads.

Choi, a former defender who played for South Korea during the 1994 World Cup held in the United States, said the North Koreans played like they were “waging a war,” violently swinging their elbows and hands and driving into their opponents knee first when competing for balls in air.

“I have never seen something like this in soccer before,” he said.

When they weren’t playing or training, South Korean players and staff were holed up at the Koryo Hotel, which appeared to have no other guests, Choi said. They had no outside contact, having left their cellphones at the South Korean Embassy in Beijing before entering the North. Choi said North Korean officials didn’t inform the South Korean team the match would be played in an empty stadium.

“We got there an hour and a half early and kept thinking that the gate will open and a crowd of 50,000 would pour in,” Choi said. “But the gate never opened until the end.”

The game was the first competitive meeting between the national men’s teams in the North Korean capital, although the North hosted the South in a friendly in 1990.

North Korea in recent months has severed virtually all cooperation with the South amid deadlocked nuclear negotiations with the United States, and repeatedly ignored the South’s calls for discussions on media coverage issues and allowing South Korean cheer squads ahead of the game.

South Korean Unification Minister Kim Yeon-chul, Seoul’s point man on North Korea, said during a parliamentary session on Thursday that the way the North handled the game was “very disappointing” and reflected the stalemate in inter-Korean relations.

Some experts say the North was expressing its political displeasure with the South by shutting out rival reporters and fans, but opted to compete in an empty stadium at home in an effort to level the playing field and avoid questions about fairness.

Others say North Korea might have been concerned about the possibility of its national team losing to the South in front of a massive home crowd, which would have been a humiliating development for leader Kim Jong Un, who has a passion for sports.

The awkward buildup to the game “demonstrates the immense discontent North Korea has for (South Korea)” for its failure to break away from its U.S. ally and restart inter-Korean economic projects held back by U.S.-led sanctions, said Choi Kang, vice president of Seoul’s Asan Institute for Policy Studies.

During qualification for the 2010 World Cup, North Korea chose to host games against South Korea in Shanghai, refusing to hoist the South Korean flag and play the South Korean anthem on its soil.

The fate of the game in Pyongyang was uncertain until last month when the governing body of Asian soccer informed the KFA that the North decided it would host the qualifier as scheduled.

South Korea’s two Group H matches against North Korea will be crucial in qualifying for the World Cup. The second match between the Koreas is scheduled for June 4 in South Korea.

South Korea has dominated the past 17 inter-Korean matches with seven wins, one loss and nine draws.

Group H also includes Lebanon, Turkmenistan and Sri Lanka.

 

 

Man City vs Crystal Palace Live

Man City vs Crystal Palace Live: Man City vs Crystal Palace Live Stream Online Soccer Game 2019 Watch Free TV Schedule, With the help of newer technologies, it has become very easy to enjoy the games on gadgets. Today Soccer games engineered to offer the highest quality services at the best prices. Fans only have to pay a little amount to enjoy the Football Games. Fans can watch Football Game online on their Ipad, Mac, Pc, laptop or any Android device.

North Korea’s football team played like it was “waging a war” during a World Cup qualifier in Pyongyang against South Korea, the South’s manager has said.

The two national teams played out a scoreless draw on Tuesday at the huge Kim Il-sung Stadium, which was empty of spectators. The match took place under a media blackout, and the South Koreans first spoke to journalists about the conditions on their return to Seoul on Thursday.

The team’s general manager, Choi Young-il, said the South Korean football association (KFA) would discuss whether to submit a complaint to Fifa over what he described as North Korea’s failure to properly accommodate the visiting team and decision to block media and spectators.

No fans, no media and no goals as Koreas play out World Cup qualifier in empty stadium
Read more
Choi told reporters at Incheon airport that the North Koreans played like they were “waging a war”, violently swinging their elbows and hands and driving into their opponents knee-first when competing for balls in the air. “I have never seen something like this in soccer before,” he said.

Son Heung-min, South Korea’s captain and Tottenham striker, said: “The opponents were very rough, and there were moments when very abusive language was exchanged. It was hard to concentrate on the match because you were thinking about avoiding injury first … It’s an accomplishment that we returned from a game like that without injury.”

No foreign media were allowed and the game was not broadcast live.

The Fifa president, Gianni Infantino, who also attended the match, issued a statement on Tuesday saying he was “disappointed to see there were no fans in the stands”.

He said: “We were surprised by this and by several issues related to its live broadcast and problems with visas and access for foreign journalists.”

Pyongyang’s official Korean Central News Agency published only a brief match report, saying the “game of attacks and counterattacks ended in a draw 0-0”.

North Korea did provide a DVD recording of the match to South Korean football officials, but the South Korean TV channel KBS cancelled plans to broadcast the game on tape delay because of the video’s poor quality, according to the broadcaster and the KFA.

“We probably won’t get another video from North Korea,” said Park Jae-sung, a KFA official, adding the video was unfit for South Korea’s high-definition TV services.

The North had been expected to have a clear home advantage in a 50,000-capacity stadium devoid of opposition fans, but South Korean players and football officials were surprised to discover there would be no home support either.

Son said it was regrettable that South Korea, which has a stronger team on paper, could not return with three points, but admitted their opponents’ physical playing style had affected morale.
When they were not playing or training, South Korean players and staff were holed up at the Koryo hotel, which appeared to have no other guests, Choi said. They had no outside contact, having left their mobile phones at the South Korean embassy in Beijing before entering the North. Choi said North Korean officials did not inform the South Korean team the match would be played in an empty stadium.

“We got there an hour and a half early and kept thinking that the gate will open and a crowd of 50,000 would pour in,” Choi said. “But the gate never opened until the end.”

The game was the first competitive meeting between the national men’s teams in the North Korean capital, although the North hosted the South in a friendly in 1990.
South Korea’s national soccer team described their World Cup qualifier against North Korea in Pyongyang as a “rough” match played under strange conditions that may be raised with FIFA.

The historic match ended in a scoreless draw Tuesday at huge Kim Il Sung Stadium, which was empty of spectators. The match was also under a media blackout, and the South Koreans first spoke to journalists about the playing conditions upon their return to Seoul on Thursday.

“The opponents were very rough, and there were moments when very abusive language was exchanged,” Tottenham striker Son Heung-min said.

“It was hard to concentrate on the match because you were thinking about avoiding injury first … It’s an accomplishment that we returned from a game like that without injury,” Son told reporters at Incheon International Airport.

The team’s general manager Choi Young-il said the South Korean soccer association, known as KFA, will discuss whether to submit a complaint to FIFA over what he described as North Korea’s failure to properly accommodate the visiting team and decision to block media and spectators.

North Korea kept out South Korean media and spectators and refused a live broadcast from the stadium.

FIFA President Gianni Infantino also attended the match, and on Tuesday issued a statement saying he was “disappointed to see there were no fans in the stands.”

“We were surprised by this and by several issues related to its live broadcast and problems with visas and access for foreign journalists,” Infantino said.

Pyongyang’s official Korean Central News Agency published only a brief match report, saying the “game of attacks and counterattacks ended in a draw 0:0.”

North Korea did provide a DVD recording of the match to South Korean soccer officials, but South Korean TV channel KBS canceled plans to broadcast the game on tape delay because of the video’s quality, according to the broadcaster and KFA.

“We probably won’t get another video from North Korea,” said Park Jae-sung, a KFA official, adding the video was unfit for South Korea’s high-definition TV services

The North had been expected to have a unique home advantage in the 50,000-capacity stadium devoid of South Korean fans, but South Korean players and soccer officials were surprised to realize there would be no home crowd support, either.

Son said it was regrettable that South Korea, which has a stronger team on paper, couldn’t return with three points, but admitted that their opponents’ physical play got into the players’ heads.

Choi, a former defender who played for South Korea during the 1994 World Cup held in the United States, said the North Koreans played like they were “waging a war,” violently swinging their elbows and hands and driving into their opponents knee first when competing for balls in air.

“I have never seen something like this in soccer before,” he said.

When they weren’t playing or training, South Korean players and staff were holed up at the Koryo Hotel, which appeared to have no other guests, Choi said. They had no outside contact, having left their cellphones at the South Korean Embassy in Beijing before entering the North. Choi said North Korean officials didn’t inform the South Korean team the match would be played in an empty stadium.

“We got there an hour and a half early and kept thinking that the gate will open and a crowd of 50,000 would pour in,” Choi said. “But the gate never opened until the end.”

The game was the first competitive meeting between the national men’s teams in the North Korean capital, although the North hosted the South in a friendly in 1990.

North Korea in recent months has severed virtually all cooperation with the South amid deadlocked nuclear negotiations with the United States, and repeatedly ignored the South’s calls for discussions on media coverage issues and allowing South Korean cheer squads ahead of the game.

South Korean Unification Minister Kim Yeon-chul, Seoul’s point man on North Korea, said during a parliamentary session on Thursday that the way the North handled the game was “very disappointing” and reflected the stalemate in inter-Korean relations.

Some experts say the North was expressing its political displeasure with the South by shutting out rival reporters and fans, but opted to compete in an empty stadium at home in an effort to level the playing field and avoid questions about fairness.

Others say North Korea might have been concerned about the possibility of its national team losing to the South in front of a massive home crowd, which would have been a humiliating development for leader Kim Jong Un, who has a passion for sports.

The awkward buildup to the game “demonstrates the immense discontent North Korea has for (South Korea)” for its failure to break away from its U.S. ally and restart inter-Korean economic projects held back by U.S.-led sanctions, said Choi Kang, vice president of Seoul’s Asan Institute for Policy Studies.

During qualification for the 2010 World Cup, North Korea chose to host games against South Korea in Shanghai, refusing to hoist the South Korean flag and play the South Korean anthem on its soil.

The fate of the game in Pyongyang was uncertain until last month when the governing body of Asian soccer informed the KFA that the North decided it would host the qualifier as scheduled.

South Korea’s two Group H matches against North Korea will be crucial in qualifying for the World Cup. The second match between the Koreas is scheduled for June 4 in South Korea.

South Korea has dominated the past 17 inter-Korean matches with seven wins, one loss and nine draws.

Group H also includes Lebanon, Turkmenistan and Sri Lanka.

 

 

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North Korea’s football team played like it was “waging a war” during a World Cup qualifier in Pyongyang against South Korea, the South’s manager has said.

The two national teams played out a scoreless draw on Tuesday at the huge Kim Il-sung Stadium, which was empty of spectators. The match took place under a media blackout, and the South Koreans first spoke to journalists about the conditions on their return to Seoul on Thursday.

The team’s general manager, Choi Young-il, said the South Korean football association (KFA) would discuss whether to submit a complaint to Fifa over what he described as North Korea’s failure to properly accommodate the visiting team and decision to block media and spectators.

No fans, no media and no goals as Koreas play out World Cup qualifier in empty stadium
Read more
Choi told reporters at Incheon airport that the North Koreans played like they were “waging a war”, violently swinging their elbows and hands and driving into their opponents knee-first when competing for balls in the air. “I have never seen something like this in soccer before,” he said.

Son Heung-min, South Korea’s captain and Tottenham striker, said: “The opponents were very rough, and there were moments when very abusive language was exchanged. It was hard to concentrate on the match because you were thinking about avoiding injury first … It’s an accomplishment that we returned from a game like that without injury.”

No foreign media were allowed and the game was not broadcast live.

The Fifa president, Gianni Infantino, who also attended the match, issued a statement on Tuesday saying he was “disappointed to see there were no fans in the stands”.

He said: “We were surprised by this and by several issues related to its live broadcast and problems with visas and access for foreign journalists.”

Pyongyang’s official Korean Central News Agency published only a brief match report, saying the “game of attacks and counterattacks ended in a draw 0-0”.

North Korea did provide a DVD recording of the match to South Korean football officials, but the South Korean TV channel KBS cancelled plans to broadcast the game on tape delay because of the video’s poor quality, according to the broadcaster and the KFA.

“We probably won’t get another video from North Korea,” said Park Jae-sung, a KFA official, adding the video was unfit for South Korea’s high-definition TV services.

The North had been expected to have a clear home advantage in a 50,000-capacity stadium devoid of opposition fans, but South Korean players and football officials were surprised to discover there would be no home support either.

Son said it was regrettable that South Korea, which has a stronger team on paper, could not return with three points, but admitted their opponents’ physical playing style had affected morale.
When they were not playing or training, South Korean players and staff were holed up at the Koryo hotel, which appeared to have no other guests, Choi said. They had no outside contact, having left their mobile phones at the South Korean embassy in Beijing before entering the North. Choi said North Korean officials did not inform the South Korean team the match would be played in an empty stadium.

“We got there an hour and a half early and kept thinking that the gate will open and a crowd of 50,000 would pour in,” Choi said. “But the gate never opened until the end.”

The game was the first competitive meeting between the national men’s teams in the North Korean capital, although the North hosted the South in a friendly in 1990.
South Korea’s national soccer team described their World Cup qualifier against North Korea in Pyongyang as a “rough” match played under strange conditions that may be raised with FIFA.

The historic match ended in a scoreless draw Tuesday at huge Kim Il Sung Stadium, which was empty of spectators. The match was also under a media blackout, and the South Koreans first spoke to journalists about the playing conditions upon their return to Seoul on Thursday.

“The opponents were very rough, and there were moments when very abusive language was exchanged,” Tottenham striker Son Heung-min said.

“It was hard to concentrate on the match because you were thinking about avoiding injury first … It’s an accomplishment that we returned from a game like that without injury,” Son told reporters at Incheon International Airport.

The team’s general manager Choi Young-il said the South Korean soccer association, known as KFA, will discuss whether to submit a complaint to FIFA over what he described as North Korea’s failure to properly accommodate the visiting team and decision to block media and spectators.

North Korea kept out South Korean media and spectators and refused a live broadcast from the stadium.

FIFA President Gianni Infantino also attended the match, and on Tuesday issued a statement saying he was “disappointed to see there were no fans in the stands.”

“We were surprised by this and by several issues related to its live broadcast and problems with visas and access for foreign journalists,” Infantino said.

Pyongyang’s official Korean Central News Agency published only a brief match report, saying the “game of attacks and counterattacks ended in a draw 0:0.”

North Korea did provide a DVD recording of the match to South Korean soccer officials, but South Korean TV channel KBS canceled plans to broadcast the game on tape delay because of the video’s quality, according to the broadcaster and KFA.

“We probably won’t get another video from North Korea,” said Park Jae-sung, a KFA official, adding the video was unfit for South Korea’s high-definition TV services

The North had been expected to have a unique home advantage in the 50,000-capacity stadium devoid of South Korean fans, but South Korean players and soccer officials were surprised to realize there would be no home crowd support, either.

Son said it was regrettable that South Korea, which has a stronger team on paper, couldn’t return with three points, but admitted that their opponents’ physical play got into the players’ heads.

Choi, a former defender who played for South Korea during the 1994 World Cup held in the United States, said the North Koreans played like they were “waging a war,” violently swinging their elbows and hands and driving into their opponents knee first when competing for balls in air.

“I have never seen something like this in soccer before,” he said.

When they weren’t playing or training, South Korean players and staff were holed up at the Koryo Hotel, which appeared to have no other guests, Choi said. They had no outside contact, having left their cellphones at the South Korean Embassy in Beijing before entering the North. Choi said North Korean officials didn’t inform the South Korean team the match would be played in an empty stadium.

“We got there an hour and a half early and kept thinking that the gate will open and a crowd of 50,000 would pour in,” Choi said. “But the gate never opened until the end.”

The game was the first competitive meeting between the national men’s teams in the North Korean capital, although the North hosted the South in a friendly in 1990.

North Korea in recent months has severed virtually all cooperation with the South amid deadlocked nuclear negotiations with the United States, and repeatedly ignored the South’s calls for discussions on media coverage issues and allowing South Korean cheer squads ahead of the game.

South Korean Unification Minister Kim Yeon-chul, Seoul’s point man on North Korea, said during a parliamentary session on Thursday that the way the North handled the game was “very disappointing” and reflected the stalemate in inter-Korean relations.

Some experts say the North was expressing its political displeasure with the South by shutting out rival reporters and fans, but opted to compete in an empty stadium at home in an effort to level the playing field and avoid questions about fairness.

Others say North Korea might have been concerned about the possibility of its national team losing to the South in front of a massive home crowd, which would have been a humiliating development for leader Kim Jong Un, who has a passion for sports.

The awkward buildup to the game “demonstrates the immense discontent North Korea has for (South Korea)” for its failure to break away from its U.S. ally and restart inter-Korean economic projects held back by U.S.-led sanctions, said Choi Kang, vice president of Seoul’s Asan Institute for Policy Studies.

During qualification for the 2010 World Cup, North Korea chose to host games against South Korea in Shanghai, refusing to hoist the South Korean flag and play the South Korean anthem on its soil.

The fate of the game in Pyongyang was uncertain until last month when the governing body of Asian soccer informed the KFA that the North decided it would host the qualifier as scheduled.

South Korea’s two Group H matches against North Korea will be crucial in qualifying for the World Cup. The second match between the Koreas is scheduled for June 4 in South Korea.

South Korea has dominated the past 17 inter-Korean matches with seven wins, one loss and nine draws.

Group H also includes Lebanon, Turkmenistan and Sri Lanka.

 

 

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North Korea’s football team played like it was “waging a war” during a World Cup qualifier in Pyongyang against South Korea, the South’s manager has said.

The two national teams played out a scoreless draw on Tuesday at the huge Kim Il-sung Stadium, which was empty of spectators. The match took place under a media blackout, and the South Koreans first spoke to journalists about the conditions on their return to Seoul on Thursday.

The team’s general manager, Choi Young-il, said the South Korean football association (KFA) would discuss whether to submit a complaint to Fifa over what he described as North Korea’s failure to properly accommodate the visiting team and decision to block media and spectators.

No fans, no media and no goals as Koreas play out World Cup qualifier in empty stadium
Read more
Choi told reporters at Incheon airport that the North Koreans played like they were “waging a war”, violently swinging their elbows and hands and driving into their opponents knee-first when competing for balls in the air. “I have never seen something like this in soccer before,” he said.

Son Heung-min, South Korea’s captain and Tottenham striker, said: “The opponents were very rough, and there were moments when very abusive language was exchanged. It was hard to concentrate on the match because you were thinking about avoiding injury first … It’s an accomplishment that we returned from a game like that without injury.”

No foreign media were allowed and the game was not broadcast live.

The Fifa president, Gianni Infantino, who also attended the match, issued a statement on Tuesday saying he was “disappointed to see there were no fans in the stands”.

He said: “We were surprised by this and by several issues related to its live broadcast and problems with visas and access for foreign journalists.”

Pyongyang’s official Korean Central News Agency published only a brief match report, saying the “game of attacks and counterattacks ended in a draw 0-0”.

North Korea did provide a DVD recording of the match to South Korean football officials, but the South Korean TV channel KBS cancelled plans to broadcast the game on tape delay because of the video’s poor quality, according to the broadcaster and the KFA.

“We probably won’t get another video from North Korea,” said Park Jae-sung, a KFA official, adding the video was unfit for South Korea’s high-definition TV services.

The North had been expected to have a clear home advantage in a 50,000-capacity stadium devoid of opposition fans, but South Korean players and football officials were surprised to discover there would be no home support either.

Son said it was regrettable that South Korea, which has a stronger team on paper, could not return with three points, but admitted their opponents’ physical playing style had affected morale.
When they were not playing or training, South Korean players and staff were holed up at the Koryo hotel, which appeared to have no other guests, Choi said. They had no outside contact, having left their mobile phones at the South Korean embassy in Beijing before entering the North. Choi said North Korean officials did not inform the South Korean team the match would be played in an empty stadium.

“We got there an hour and a half early and kept thinking that the gate will open and a crowd of 50,000 would pour in,” Choi said. “But the gate never opened until the end.”

The game was the first competitive meeting between the national men’s teams in the North Korean capital, although the North hosted the South in a friendly in 1990.
South Korea’s national soccer team described their World Cup qualifier against North Korea in Pyongyang as a “rough” match played under strange conditions that may be raised with FIFA.

The historic match ended in a scoreless draw Tuesday at huge Kim Il Sung Stadium, which was empty of spectators. The match was also under a media blackout, and the South Koreans first spoke to journalists about the playing conditions upon their return to Seoul on Thursday.

“The opponents were very rough, and there were moments when very abusive language was exchanged,” Tottenham striker Son Heung-min said.

“It was hard to concentrate on the match because you were thinking about avoiding injury first … It’s an accomplishment that we returned from a game like that without injury,” Son told reporters at Incheon International Airport.

The team’s general manager Choi Young-il said the South Korean soccer association, known as KFA, will discuss whether to submit a complaint to FIFA over what he described as North Korea’s failure to properly accommodate the visiting team and decision to block media and spectators.

North Korea kept out South Korean media and spectators and refused a live broadcast from the stadium.

FIFA President Gianni Infantino also attended the match, and on Tuesday issued a statement saying he was “disappointed to see there were no fans in the stands.”

“We were surprised by this and by several issues related to its live broadcast and problems with visas and access for foreign journalists,” Infantino said.

Pyongyang’s official Korean Central News Agency published only a brief match report, saying the “game of attacks and counterattacks ended in a draw 0:0.”

North Korea did provide a DVD recording of the match to South Korean soccer officials, but South Korean TV channel KBS canceled plans to broadcast the game on tape delay because of the video’s quality, according to the broadcaster and KFA.

“We probably won’t get another video from North Korea,” said Park Jae-sung, a KFA official, adding the video was unfit for South Korea’s high-definition TV services

The North had been expected to have a unique home advantage in the 50,000-capacity stadium devoid of South Korean fans, but South Korean players and soccer officials were surprised to realize there would be no home crowd support, either.

Son said it was regrettable that South Korea, which has a stronger team on paper, couldn’t return with three points, but admitted that their opponents’ physical play got into the players’ heads.

Choi, a former defender who played for South Korea during the 1994 World Cup held in the United States, said the North Koreans played like they were “waging a war,” violently swinging their elbows and hands and driving into their opponents knee first when competing for balls in air.

“I have never seen something like this in soccer before,” he said.

When they weren’t playing or training, South Korean players and staff were holed up at the Koryo Hotel, which appeared to have no other guests, Choi said. They had no outside contact, having left their cellphones at the South Korean Embassy in Beijing before entering the North. Choi said North Korean officials didn’t inform the South Korean team the match would be played in an empty stadium.

“We got there an hour and a half early and kept thinking that the gate will open and a crowd of 50,000 would pour in,” Choi said. “But the gate never opened until the end.”

The game was the first competitive meeting between the national men’s teams in the North Korean capital, although the North hosted the South in a friendly in 1990.

North Korea in recent months has severed virtually all cooperation with the South amid deadlocked nuclear negotiations with the United States, and repeatedly ignored the South’s calls for discussions on media coverage issues and allowing South Korean cheer squads ahead of the game.

South Korean Unification Minister Kim Yeon-chul, Seoul’s point man on North Korea, said during a parliamentary session on Thursday that the way the North handled the game was “very disappointing” and reflected the stalemate in inter-Korean relations.

Some experts say the North was expressing its political displeasure with the South by shutting out rival reporters and fans, but opted to compete in an empty stadium at home in an effort to level the playing field and avoid questions about fairness.

Others say North Korea might have been concerned about the possibility of its national team losing to the South in front of a massive home crowd, which would have been a humiliating development for leader Kim Jong Un, who has a passion for sports.

The awkward buildup to the game “demonstrates the immense discontent North Korea has for (South Korea)” for its failure to break away from its U.S. ally and restart inter-Korean economic projects held back by U.S.-led sanctions, said Choi Kang, vice president of Seoul’s Asan Institute for Policy Studies.

During qualification for the 2010 World Cup, North Korea chose to host games against South Korea in Shanghai, refusing to hoist the South Korean flag and play the South Korean anthem on its soil.

The fate of the game in Pyongyang was uncertain until last month when the governing body of Asian soccer informed the KFA that the North decided it would host the qualifier as scheduled.

South Korea’s two Group H matches against North Korea will be crucial in qualifying for the World Cup. The second match between the Koreas is scheduled for June 4 in South Korea.

South Korea has dominated the past 17 inter-Korean matches with seven wins, one loss and nine draws.

Group H also includes Lebanon, Turkmenistan and Sri Lanka.

 

 

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North Korea’s football team played like it was “waging a war” during a World Cup qualifier in Pyongyang against South Korea, the South’s manager has said.

The two national teams played out a scoreless draw on Tuesday at the huge Kim Il-sung Stadium, which was empty of spectators. The match took place under a media blackout, and the South Koreans first spoke to journalists about the conditions on their return to Seoul on Thursday.

The team’s general manager, Choi Young-il, said the South Korean football association (KFA) would discuss whether to submit a complaint to Fifa over what he described as North Korea’s failure to properly accommodate the visiting team and decision to block media and spectators.

No fans, no media and no goals as Koreas play out World Cup qualifier in empty stadium
Read more
Choi told reporters at Incheon airport that the North Koreans played like they were “waging a war”, violently swinging their elbows and hands and driving into their opponents knee-first when competing for balls in the air. “I have never seen something like this in soccer before,” he said.

Son Heung-min, South Korea’s captain and Tottenham striker, said: “The opponents were very rough, and there were moments when very abusive language was exchanged. It was hard to concentrate on the match because you were thinking about avoiding injury first … It’s an accomplishment that we returned from a game like that without injury.”

No foreign media were allowed and the game was not broadcast live.

The Fifa president, Gianni Infantino, who also attended the match, issued a statement on Tuesday saying he was “disappointed to see there were no fans in the stands”.

He said: “We were surprised by this and by several issues related to its live broadcast and problems with visas and access for foreign journalists.”

Pyongyang’s official Korean Central News Agency published only a brief match report, saying the “game of attacks and counterattacks ended in a draw 0-0”.

North Korea did provide a DVD recording of the match to South Korean football officials, but the South Korean TV channel KBS cancelled plans to broadcast the game on tape delay because of the video’s poor quality, according to the broadcaster and the KFA.

“We probably won’t get another video from North Korea,” said Park Jae-sung, a KFA official, adding the video was unfit for South Korea’s high-definition TV services.

The North had been expected to have a clear home advantage in a 50,000-capacity stadium devoid of opposition fans, but South Korean players and football officials were surprised to discover there would be no home support either.

Son said it was regrettable that South Korea, which has a stronger team on paper, could not return with three points, but admitted their opponents’ physical playing style had affected morale.
When they were not playing or training, South Korean players and staff were holed up at the Koryo hotel, which appeared to have no other guests, Choi said. They had no outside contact, having left their mobile phones at the South Korean embassy in Beijing before entering the North. Choi said North Korean officials did not inform the South Korean team the match would be played in an empty stadium.

“We got there an hour and a half early and kept thinking that the gate will open and a crowd of 50,000 would pour in,” Choi said. “But the gate never opened until the end.”

The game was the first competitive meeting between the national men’s teams in the North Korean capital, although the North hosted the South in a friendly in 1990.
South Korea’s national soccer team described their World Cup qualifier against North Korea in Pyongyang as a “rough” match played under strange conditions that may be raised with FIFA.

The historic match ended in a scoreless draw Tuesday at huge Kim Il Sung Stadium, which was empty of spectators. The match was also under a media blackout, and the South Koreans first spoke to journalists about the playing conditions upon their return to Seoul on Thursday.

“The opponents were very rough, and there were moments when very abusive language was exchanged,” Tottenham striker Son Heung-min said.

“It was hard to concentrate on the match because you were thinking about avoiding injury first … It’s an accomplishment that we returned from a game like that without injury,” Son told reporters at Incheon International Airport.

The team’s general manager Choi Young-il said the South Korean soccer association, known as KFA, will discuss whether to submit a complaint to FIFA over what he described as North Korea’s failure to properly accommodate the visiting team and decision to block media and spectators.

North Korea kept out South Korean media and spectators and refused a live broadcast from the stadium.

FIFA President Gianni Infantino also attended the match, and on Tuesday issued a statement saying he was “disappointed to see there were no fans in the stands.”

“We were surprised by this and by several issues related to its live broadcast and problems with visas and access for foreign journalists,” Infantino said.

Pyongyang’s official Korean Central News Agency published only a brief match report, saying the “game of attacks and counterattacks ended in a draw 0:0.”

North Korea did provide a DVD recording of the match to South Korean soccer officials, but South Korean TV channel KBS canceled plans to broadcast the game on tape delay because of the video’s quality, according to the broadcaster and KFA.

“We probably won’t get another video from North Korea,” said Park Jae-sung, a KFA official, adding the video was unfit for South Korea’s high-definition TV services

The North had been expected to have a unique home advantage in the 50,000-capacity stadium devoid of South Korean fans, but South Korean players and soccer officials were surprised to realize there would be no home crowd support, either.

Son said it was regrettable that South Korea, which has a stronger team on paper, couldn’t return with three points, but admitted that their opponents’ physical play got into the players’ heads.

Choi, a former defender who played for South Korea during the 1994 World Cup held in the United States, said the North Koreans played like they were “waging a war,” violently swinging their elbows and hands and driving into their opponents knee first when competing for balls in air.

“I have never seen something like this in soccer before,” he said.

When they weren’t playing or training, South Korean players and staff were holed up at the Koryo Hotel, which appeared to have no other guests, Choi said. They had no outside contact, having left their cellphones at the South Korean Embassy in Beijing before entering the North. Choi said North Korean officials didn’t inform the South Korean team the match would be played in an empty stadium.

“We got there an hour and a half early and kept thinking that the gate will open and a crowd of 50,000 would pour in,” Choi said. “But the gate never opened until the end.”

The game was the first competitive meeting between the national men’s teams in the North Korean capital, although the North hosted the South in a friendly in 1990.

North Korea in recent months has severed virtually all cooperation with the South amid deadlocked nuclear negotiations with the United States, and repeatedly ignored the South’s calls for discussions on media coverage issues and allowing South Korean cheer squads ahead of the game.

South Korean Unification Minister Kim Yeon-chul, Seoul’s point man on North Korea, said during a parliamentary session on Thursday that the way the North handled the game was “very disappointing” and reflected the stalemate in inter-Korean relations.

Some experts say the North was expressing its political displeasure with the South by shutting out rival reporters and fans, but opted to compete in an empty stadium at home in an effort to level the playing field and avoid questions about fairness.

Others say North Korea might have been concerned about the possibility of its national team losing to the South in front of a massive home crowd, which would have been a humiliating development for leader Kim Jong Un, who has a passion for sports.

The awkward buildup to the game “demonstrates the immense discontent North Korea has for (South Korea)” for its failure to break away from its U.S. ally and restart inter-Korean economic projects held back by U.S.-led sanctions, said Choi Kang, vice president of Seoul’s Asan Institute for Policy Studies.

During qualification for the 2010 World Cup, North Korea chose to host games against South Korea in Shanghai, refusing to hoist the South Korean flag and play the South Korean anthem on its soil.

The fate of the game in Pyongyang was uncertain until last month when the governing body of Asian soccer informed the KFA that the North decided it would host the qualifier as scheduled.

South Korea’s two Group H matches against North Korea will be crucial in qualifying for the World Cup. The second match between the Koreas is scheduled for June 4 in South Korea.

South Korea has dominated the past 17 inter-Korean matches with seven wins, one loss and nine draws.

Group H also includes Lebanon, Turkmenistan and Sri Lanka.

 

 

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North Korea’s football team played like it was “waging a war” during a World Cup qualifier in Pyongyang against South Korea, the South’s manager has said.

The two national teams played out a scoreless draw on Tuesday at the huge Kim Il-sung Stadium, which was empty of spectators. The match took place under a media blackout, and the South Koreans first spoke to journalists about the conditions on their return to Seoul on Thursday.

The team’s general manager, Choi Young-il, said the South Korean football association (KFA) would discuss whether to submit a complaint to Fifa over what he described as North Korea’s failure to properly accommodate the visiting team and decision to block media and spectators.

No fans, no media and no goals as Koreas play out World Cup qualifier in empty stadium
Read more
Choi told reporters at Incheon airport that the North Koreans played like they were “waging a war”, violently swinging their elbows and hands and driving into their opponents knee-first when competing for balls in the air. “I have never seen something like this in soccer before,” he said.

Son Heung-min, South Korea’s captain and Tottenham striker, said: “The opponents were very rough, and there were moments when very abusive language was exchanged. It was hard to concentrate on the match because you were thinking about avoiding injury first … It’s an accomplishment that we returned from a game like that without injury.”

No foreign media were allowed and the game was not broadcast live.

The Fifa president, Gianni Infantino, who also attended the match, issued a statement on Tuesday saying he was “disappointed to see there were no fans in the stands”.

He said: “We were surprised by this and by several issues related to its live broadcast and problems with visas and access for foreign journalists.”

Pyongyang’s official Korean Central News Agency published only a brief match report, saying the “game of attacks and counterattacks ended in a draw 0-0”.

North Korea did provide a DVD recording of the match to South Korean football officials, but the South Korean TV channel KBS cancelled plans to broadcast the game on tape delay because of the video’s poor quality, according to the broadcaster and the KFA.

“We probably won’t get another video from North Korea,” said Park Jae-sung, a KFA official, adding the video was unfit for South Korea’s high-definition TV services.

The North had been expected to have a clear home advantage in a 50,000-capacity stadium devoid of opposition fans, but South Korean players and football officials were surprised to discover there would be no home support either.

Son said it was regrettable that South Korea, which has a stronger team on paper, could not return with three points, but admitted their opponents’ physical playing style had affected morale.
When they were not playing or training, South Korean players and staff were holed up at the Koryo hotel, which appeared to have no other guests, Choi said. They had no outside contact, having left their mobile phones at the South Korean embassy in Beijing before entering the North. Choi said North Korean officials did not inform the South Korean team the match would be played in an empty stadium.

“We got there an hour and a half early and kept thinking that the gate will open and a crowd of 50,000 would pour in,” Choi said. “But the gate never opened until the end.”

The game was the first competitive meeting between the national men’s teams in the North Korean capital, although the North hosted the South in a friendly in 1990.
South Korea’s national soccer team described their World Cup qualifier against North Korea in Pyongyang as a “rough” match played under strange conditions that may be raised with FIFA.

The historic match ended in a scoreless draw Tuesday at huge Kim Il Sung Stadium, which was empty of spectators. The match was also under a media blackout, and the South Koreans first spoke to journalists about the playing conditions upon their return to Seoul on Thursday.

“The opponents were very rough, and there were moments when very abusive language was exchanged,” Tottenham striker Son Heung-min said.

“It was hard to concentrate on the match because you were thinking about avoiding injury first … It’s an accomplishment that we returned from a game like that without injury,” Son told reporters at Incheon International Airport.

The team’s general manager Choi Young-il said the South Korean soccer association, known as KFA, will discuss whether to submit a complaint to FIFA over what he described as North Korea’s failure to properly accommodate the visiting team and decision to block media and spectators.

North Korea kept out South Korean media and spectators and refused a live broadcast from the stadium.

FIFA President Gianni Infantino also attended the match, and on Tuesday issued a statement saying he was “disappointed to see there were no fans in the stands.”

“We were surprised by this and by several issues related to its live broadcast and problems with visas and access for foreign journalists,” Infantino said.

Pyongyang’s official Korean Central News Agency published only a brief match report, saying the “game of attacks and counterattacks ended in a draw 0:0.”

North Korea did provide a DVD recording of the match to South Korean soccer officials, but South Korean TV channel KBS canceled plans to broadcast the game on tape delay because of the video’s quality, according to the broadcaster and KFA.

“We probably won’t get another video from North Korea,” said Park Jae-sung, a KFA official, adding the video was unfit for South Korea’s high-definition TV services

The North had been expected to have a unique home advantage in the 50,000-capacity stadium devoid of South Korean fans, but South Korean players and soccer officials were surprised to realize there would be no home crowd support, either.

Son said it was regrettable that South Korea, which has a stronger team on paper, couldn’t return with three points, but admitted that their opponents’ physical play got into the players’ heads.

Choi, a former defender who played for South Korea during the 1994 World Cup held in the United States, said the North Koreans played like they were “waging a war,” violently swinging their elbows and hands and driving into their opponents knee first when competing for balls in air.

“I have never seen something like this in soccer before,” he said.

When they weren’t playing or training, South Korean players and staff were holed up at the Koryo Hotel, which appeared to have no other guests, Choi said. They had no outside contact, having left their cellphones at the South Korean Embassy in Beijing before entering the North. Choi said North Korean officials didn’t inform the South Korean team the match would be played in an empty stadium.

“We got there an hour and a half early and kept thinking that the gate will open and a crowd of 50,000 would pour in,” Choi said. “But the gate never opened until the end.”

The game was the first competitive meeting between the national men’s teams in the North Korean capital, although the North hosted the South in a friendly in 1990.

North Korea in recent months has severed virtually all cooperation with the South amid deadlocked nuclear negotiations with the United States, and repeatedly ignored the South’s calls for discussions on media coverage issues and allowing South Korean cheer squads ahead of the game.

South Korean Unification Minister Kim Yeon-chul, Seoul’s point man on North Korea, said during a parliamentary session on Thursday that the way the North handled the game was “very disappointing” and reflected the stalemate in inter-Korean relations.

Some experts say the North was expressing its political displeasure with the South by shutting out rival reporters and fans, but opted to compete in an empty stadium at home in an effort to level the playing field and avoid questions about fairness.

Others say North Korea might have been concerned about the possibility of its national team losing to the South in front of a massive home crowd, which would have been a humiliating development for leader Kim Jong Un, who has a passion for sports.

The awkward buildup to the game “demonstrates the immense discontent North Korea has for (South Korea)” for its failure to break away from its U.S. ally and restart inter-Korean economic projects held back by U.S.-led sanctions, said Choi Kang, vice president of Seoul’s Asan Institute for Policy Studies.

During qualification for the 2010 World Cup, North Korea chose to host games against South Korea in Shanghai, refusing to hoist the South Korean flag and play the South Korean anthem on its soil.

The fate of the game in Pyongyang was uncertain until last month when the governing body of Asian soccer informed the KFA that the North decided it would host the qualifier as scheduled.

South Korea’s two Group H matches against North Korea will be crucial in qualifying for the World Cup. The second match between the Koreas is scheduled for June 4 in South Korea.

South Korea has dominated the past 17 inter-Korean matches with seven wins, one loss and nine draws.

Group H also includes Lebanon, Turkmenistan and Sri Lanka.

 

 

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North Korea’s football team played like it was “waging a war” during a World Cup qualifier in Pyongyang against South Korea, the South’s manager has said.

The two national teams played out a scoreless draw on Tuesday at the huge Kim Il-sung Stadium, which was empty of spectators. The match took place under a media blackout, and the South Koreans first spoke to journalists about the conditions on their return to Seoul on Thursday.

The team’s general manager, Choi Young-il, said the South Korean football association (KFA) would discuss whether to submit a complaint to Fifa over what he described as North Korea’s failure to properly accommodate the visiting team and decision to block media and spectators.

No fans, no media and no goals as Koreas play out World Cup qualifier in empty stadium
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Choi told reporters at Incheon airport that the North Koreans played like they were “waging a war”, violently swinging their elbows and hands and driving into their opponents knee-first when competing for balls in the air. “I have never seen something like this in soccer before,” he said.

Son Heung-min, South Korea’s captain and Tottenham striker, said: “The opponents were very rough, and there were moments when very abusive language was exchanged. It was hard to concentrate on the match because you were thinking about avoiding injury first … It’s an accomplishment that we returned from a game like that without injury.”

No foreign media were allowed and the game was not broadcast live.

The Fifa president, Gianni Infantino, who also attended the match, issued a statement on Tuesday saying he was “disappointed to see there were no fans in the stands”.

He said: “We were surprised by this and by several issues related to its live broadcast and problems with visas and access for foreign journalists.”

Pyongyang’s official Korean Central News Agency published only a brief match report, saying the “game of attacks and counterattacks ended in a draw 0-0”.

North Korea did provide a DVD recording of the match to South Korean football officials, but the South Korean TV channel KBS cancelled plans to broadcast the game on tape delay because of the video’s poor quality, according to the broadcaster and the KFA.

“We probably won’t get another video from North Korea,” said Park Jae-sung, a KFA official, adding the video was unfit for South Korea’s high-definition TV services.

The North had been expected to have a clear home advantage in a 50,000-capacity stadium devoid of opposition fans, but South Korean players and football officials were surprised to discover there would be no home support either.

Son said it was regrettable that South Korea, which has a stronger team on paper, could not return with three points, but admitted their opponents’ physical playing style had affected morale.
When they were not playing or training, South Korean players and staff were holed up at the Koryo hotel, which appeared to have no other guests, Choi said. They had no outside contact, having left their mobile phones at the South Korean embassy in Beijing before entering the North. Choi said North Korean officials did not inform the South Korean team the match would be played in an empty stadium.

“We got there an hour and a half early and kept thinking that the gate will open and a crowd of 50,000 would pour in,” Choi said. “But the gate never opened until the end.”

The game was the first competitive meeting between the national men’s teams in the North Korean capital, although the North hosted the South in a friendly in 1990.
South Korea’s national soccer team described their World Cup qualifier against North Korea in Pyongyang as a “rough” match played under strange conditions that may be raised with FIFA.

The historic match ended in a scoreless draw Tuesday at huge Kim Il Sung Stadium, which was empty of spectators. The match was also under a media blackout, and the South Koreans first spoke to journalists about the playing conditions upon their return to Seoul on Thursday.

“The opponents were very rough, and there were moments when very abusive language was exchanged,” Tottenham striker Son Heung-min said.

“It was hard to concentrate on the match because you were thinking about avoiding injury first … It’s an accomplishment that we returned from a game like that without injury,” Son told reporters at Incheon International Airport.

The team’s general manager Choi Young-il said the South Korean soccer association, known as KFA, will discuss whether to submit a complaint to FIFA over what he described as North Korea’s failure to properly accommodate the visiting team and decision to block media and spectators.

North Korea kept out South Korean media and spectators and refused a live broadcast from the stadium.

FIFA President Gianni Infantino also attended the match, and on Tuesday issued a statement saying he was “disappointed to see there were no fans in the stands.”

“We were surprised by this and by several issues related to its live broadcast and problems with visas and access for foreign journalists,” Infantino said.

Pyongyang’s official Korean Central News Agency published only a brief match report, saying the “game of attacks and counterattacks ended in a draw 0:0.”

North Korea did provide a DVD recording of the match to South Korean soccer officials, but South Korean TV channel KBS canceled plans to broadcast the game on tape delay because of the video’s quality, according to the broadcaster and KFA.

“We probably won’t get another video from North Korea,” said Park Jae-sung, a KFA official, adding the video was unfit for South Korea’s high-definition TV services

The North had been expected to have a unique home advantage in the 50,000-capacity stadium devoid of South Korean fans, but South Korean players and soccer officials were surprised to realize there would be no home crowd support, either.

Son said it was regrettable that South Korea, which has a stronger team on paper, couldn’t return with three points, but admitted that their opponents’ physical play got into the players’ heads.

Choi, a former defender who played for South Korea during the 1994 World Cup held in the United States, said the North Koreans played like they were “waging a war,” violently swinging their elbows and hands and driving into their opponents knee first when competing for balls in air.

“I have never seen something like this in soccer before,” he said.

When they weren’t playing or training, South Korean players and staff were holed up at the Koryo Hotel, which appeared to have no other guests, Choi said. They had no outside contact, having left their cellphones at the South Korean Embassy in Beijing before entering the North. Choi said North Korean officials didn’t inform the South Korean team the match would be played in an empty stadium.

“We got there an hour and a half early and kept thinking that the gate will open and a crowd of 50,000 would pour in,” Choi said. “But the gate never opened until the end.”

The game was the first competitive meeting between the national men’s teams in the North Korean capital, although the North hosted the South in a friendly in 1990.

North Korea in recent months has severed virtually all cooperation with the South amid deadlocked nuclear negotiations with the United States, and repeatedly ignored the South’s calls for discussions on media coverage issues and allowing South Korean cheer squads ahead of the game.

South Korean Unification Minister Kim Yeon-chul, Seoul’s point man on North Korea, said during a parliamentary session on Thursday that the way the North handled the game was “very disappointing” and reflected the stalemate in inter-Korean relations.

Some experts say the North was expressing its political displeasure with the South by shutting out rival reporters and fans, but opted to compete in an empty stadium at home in an effort to level the playing field and avoid questions about fairness.

Others say North Korea might have been concerned about the possibility of its national team losing to the South in front of a massive home crowd, which would have been a humiliating development for leader Kim Jong Un, who has a passion for sports.

The awkward buildup to the game “demonstrates the immense discontent North Korea has for (South Korea)” for its failure to break away from its U.S. ally and restart inter-Korean economic projects held back by U.S.-led sanctions, said Choi Kang, vice president of Seoul’s Asan Institute for Policy Studies.

During qualification for the 2010 World Cup, North Korea chose to host games against South Korea in Shanghai, refusing to hoist the South Korean flag and play the South Korean anthem on its soil.

The fate of the game in Pyongyang was uncertain until last month when the governing body of Asian soccer informed the KFA that the North decided it would host the qualifier as scheduled.

South Korea’s two Group H matches against North Korea will be crucial in qualifying for the World Cup. The second match between the Koreas is scheduled for June 4 in South Korea.

South Korea has dominated the past 17 inter-Korean matches with seven wins, one loss and nine draws.

Group H also includes Lebanon, Turkmenistan and Sri Lanka.